Good life Good life

good life smash the german job interview

‘Let me take you to a place I know you want to go
It’s a good life’ 

Everyone in Berlin wants the same damn thing. Enough money to live on, a decent place to live, and good weather. Right?

Well good weather’s out of the question, and I can’t help you get a place to live, so the only thing left is money. And the big question is: how can I get enough money to live in this ‘poor but sexy’ city?

OK. I’ve read the reports. Berlin’s no longer poor but sexy. But it still has its charms don’t you think? I mean Berlin is the only capital city in Europe, the only one, that drags its national economy down. Wow!

Oh wait … that’s bad, isn’t it.

But back to getting money. In Berlin. And the Good Life. Whether you want to work freelance or angestellte, full or part-time, you need to meet people, greet people and network like crazy – and you need to convince people that you’re the person they need to hire.

So back by popular demand is our FREE Smashing the German Job Interview workshop!

Woop! Woop! On the right you can read a few comments from the last workshop in January.

“Great event! 😊”

“I really enjoyed your event and really thank you for the opportunity to attend”

“Thanks – it was so useful!”

What can I expect from this workshop?

We’ll greet you when you arrive and show you to a classroom. The teacher will take you through some activities where you’ll learn useful vocabulary to help you smash your next German job interview. And you’ll get extra tips along the way.

Oh, and they’ll be coffee and snakes. Sorry I mean snacks

What will I get out of the workshop?

As well as some super-useful vocabulary and the coffee and snakes snacks, the workshop will give you confidence in using German in a job interview situation because you will practice this vocabulary yourself – and you’ll also meet other people in the same boat!

When and where is it?

The workshop is on Saturday May 18 from 1pm to 2pm at All on Board language school.

You’ll find us at Seestr. 27, in Wedding. The nearest U-Bahn is Seestraße – on the U6. 

How can I enrol for the workshop?

Simply send an email to info@allonboard.de and we’ll put you on the list. But please let us know asap so we can guarantee you a place. Don’t leave it too late!

Well that’s all from us. We hope to see you on Saturday May 18th – perhaps we can provide you with that first step towards a Good Life!

(And maybe even some good weather … )

Cao!

 

Where can I find a Learn-German pill?

where can I find a learn german pill - all on board

How should I learn German? Once a week, twice a week, or intensively?

For German learners the problem is not just what to learn, but when and how.

I mean, every learner needs grammar, new words, and lots of conversation and listening.

That’s not the problem!


The real problems are often:

Practicalities. When will I learn? 
Particulars. Who will teach me and how?
Passion. How to keep learning and not give up!

That’s why if you’re like me – easily distracted and often stressed! – then intensive courses are the way to go. By intensive I mean every day for a while, like a few weeks or a month.

And why is this more effective? Well, instead of half a year of going to a classroom every week – it’s all over in a month! You get more bang for your buck because you learn more, remember more, and you integrate more of what you learn into your daily life.


But here’s the snag. Teaching an intensive course is an art. You’re in the same classroom every day – so the teacher needs to be alert to the personalities in the room, provide variety in the lessons, and find new ways to repeat important information. And that’s not easy!

Setting up games, role plays, pair work, and maintaining ‘the energy in the room’ takes a skilled, experienced teacher. Not only that, but intensive courses require learners to bring something to the class, to talk about themselves, and play an active part in their own learning.

Does that sound like something you want?


If so, and you want to take a Learn-German pill with us then email info@allonboard.de or call us on 030/3983 3993.

We have an A1 German intensive course starting on April 1st for four hours every morning, Monday to Thursday. (You get Friday off …😊)

For other levels contact us for details.


While you’re here check out our other blog posts such as Smash the German Job Interview and check out our website.

Good luck with learning German and I hope we speak soon. 

Tschüss! 

It’s got to be … Perfect


Do you have trouble with Perfect forms in English? Then this post is for you.

I’m a teacher myself and I see that one problem learners have, from intermediate to advanced, is using Perfect forms correctly.

And keep this quiet … but teachers have problems teaching Perfect forms too! 

It’s just not that easy because …

  • There’s no ONE easy rule for Perfect forms.
  • People learn Perfect forms as tenses – when they’re not!
  • Teachers teach ‘perfect tenses’ which people don’t use!

So this post aims to clear up the confusion for English language learners.


Let’s clear up one thing first. The Perfect form is not a tense  which shows a specific time in relation to a speaker – but an aspect which focuses on how an action is done, like if it’s complete or not, or if it’s temporary.

English has two tenses, past and present, where the main verb form changes: I eat, you eat, he/ she eats in the present; I eat, you ate in the past. (We form the future using will so it’s not a tense because the main verb stays the same e.g I will go.)

But English also has two aspects: perfect (also called perfective to confuse you) and continuous (also called progressive). The continuous aspect suggests we’re in the middle of an activity (you are reading). The perfect aspect suggests a link between two times, events, or situations. Think of it as juggling times, events or situations and keeping them in the air at the same time.

And juggling is not easy! 

Perfect forms with all on board

 


Let’s take an example. The present perfect is often used as the opening question at a party, to start a conversation:

Question: Have you been to New York?

By using the present perfect form here (have/ has + past participle) we mean have you been to New York ‘anytime before now’.

We don’t care if you went there last week, last year, or last century!

Get the picture?

However, to answer the question, you’d switch to a past tense to talk about a specific time:

Yes, I went there last year. I had a great time.

So one use of the present perfect – the most common and useful perfect form – is to talk about things ‘anytime before now’.


Some other uses of the present perfect:

1. To talk about things that just happened e.g accidents or unforeseen events:

Oh damn – I’ve dropped a plate!

I’ve lost my keys!

Phil has just called to say he’ll be late!

Here we’re ‘juggling’ the present and something that’s just happened. And we’re focused on the results!

2. To talk about actions or situations that started in the past but continue into the present.

I’ve lived here for ten years.

Here we’re juggling three times: I started living here in the past, I’m living here now, and I’m going to continue living here.

Compare this with the past tense.

I lived here for ten years. (I lived here for ten years before and now I live somewhere else.)

Also, be aware the past tense tends to create a sense of distance between the speaker and the listener, while the perfect tends to bring you closer – because when you use the perfect you’re talking about something that’s important to you now.


A few more things to know about Perfect forms:

You don’t need to know all of them.

When you speak to people in the street, you won’t need past perfect or past perfect continuous as they are very rarely used

Brits and Yanks use them differently.

Brits use perfect forms more often so it would be normal for an American to ask at a party:

Did you see the new Spike Lee film? (past simple)

Whereas a Brit would say:

Have you seen the new Spike Lee film? (present perfect)

It’s a cultural thing. Don’t sweat it.


Okay. So today I’ve taught you about Perfect forms. (See, there’s another one … see how useful it is?)

Above you’ll find a video showing five uses of the present perfect, some of which I’ve mentioned. Here’s a short test to give you some practice. (And here’s some advice on how to teach present perfect for any teachers out there.)

If you’re interested, or the company you work for is interested in learning Perfect forms with All on Board, then call 030/3983 3993 or email info@allonboard.de to discuss a course.

While you’re here check out our other blog posts and website.

Apart from that, enjoy the spring sunshine and …

Tschüss!

 

3 Phrases to Smash that German Job Interview!

A few key phrases can help you sound like a Profi and help you get that dream job.

Does your heart sink at the thought of a job interview in German? Well don’t worry … that’s normal.

It’s like writing with your left hand, or drinking coffee from the other side of the cup.

Difficult, right?


But not impossible. A few key phrases can help you sound like a Profi and help you get that dream job. (A Profi is a professional. And that’s what we are, right?)

But first here are words to avoid, because they’re over-used and altmodisch (old-fashioned).

  • zuverlässig (reliable) 
  • ordentlich (respectable, neat and tidy)
  • ehrgeizig (ambitious)

I’ll prove it. Watch the video. Can you hear the words?


Instead here are three real phrases that people really use in interviews, and they respond to three real questions you might be asked.

1. Tell us about yourself. Erzählen Sie uns etwas über sich.

Ich lege viel Wert auf Kreativität in meiner Arbeit, zum Beispiel = I place great value on creativity in my work. For example …

2. Why do you want to work here? Warum wollen Sie in unserer Firma arbeiten?

Ich hätte gern eine Stelle, bei der ich mich persönlich entwickeln kann = I really want a job where I can develop myself personally.

3. What skills can you bring to our company? Welche Fähigkeiten bringen Sie mit?

Ich bin fähig Websiten zu erstellen = I’m competent/ skilled in creating websites.

 


So there’s three phrases to help you! If you find them useful please share the blog with others.

Smashing the German Job Interview! – our free event will give you more useful phrases. It’s on Saturday 26 Jan from 1 to 2pm at All on Board school, Seestraße 27 in Wedding.

You can socialise, meet others, do some networking and learn to SMASH that German job interview and get that dream job.

To book a place call 030/3983 3993 or simply email info@allonboard.de 

But remember. Sign up by 22nd January to be sure of a place.

Tschüss!